Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A team involving our Critical Care Research Group have discovered that patients with severe illnesses treated on intensive care units often have problems with their movement and mobility long after they are discharged from hospital.

Shoulder Shutterstock

Research to date has mostly concentrated on problems with walking after discharge from hospital, but this new study shows that shoulder problems are particularly common and persist for at least six months.

The impairment of shoulder function can be severe – often equivalent to that seen with shoulder dislocation – and makes routine tasks very difficult. Any limitations to upper limb function also make it more difficult for patients to support themselves whilst recovering from lower limb problems. This slows down rehabilitation overall.

This study adds to the ongoing research being undertaken in our Kadoorie Centre for Critical Care Research investigating patient-centred outcomes following critical illness. It has implications for the assessment of function in intensive care unit survivors and for the development of treatment and rehabilitation strategies. 

Read the full paper