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Our researchers discover new evidence that post-brain injury sleep problems can slow the pace of recovery.

Woman asleep

Sleep is important for consolidation of motor learning, but brain injury may affect sleep continuity and therefore rehabilitation outcomes. This study, led by Melanie Fleming in our Wellcome Centre for Neuroimaging, aimed to assess the relationship between sleep quality and motor recovery in brain injury patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation.

The researchers analysed the sleeping patterns of 59 people with brain injury staying in a rehabilitation unit in Oxford, and 55 people who didn’t have a brain injury and were at home.

Read the full paper in Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair.

Read a summary in Neuro Rehab Times.

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