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Oxford University has recently led a successful bid to establish a €52M international consortium to develop induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines for drug discovery and safety assessment.

Dopamine neurons (in green) grown using stem cell technology
Dopamine neurons (in green) grown using stem cell technology

The StemBANCC bid, led by Dr Zam Cader was truly a team effort and involved researchers from across Oxford including the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Dunn School of Pathology, the MRC Functional Genetics Unit, the Departments of Chemistry, Psychiatry, Pharmacology, and Physiology Anatomy and Genetics, the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism and the Centre for Health, Law and Emerging Technologies.

The consortium also includes academic researchers and big pharma partners from across the UK and 10 other European countries. The project will build on Oxfords established strength in iPS cell technology to deliver a robust platform for research and to support drug discovery in the areas of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Autism, Schizophrenia, Bipolar, Migraine, Pain and Diabetes.

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