Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Our Neurometrology Group has published findings from its OxQUIP study looking at how eye movements are affected by medication in Parkinson's.

Professor Antoniades who is leading  the OxQUIP Study said: 'There has been great interest in the precise measurement of abnormalities of eye movements as a way of determining the severity of Parkinson’s disease. We are delighted to be able to share the first results from this study and express our gratitude to our lovely patients for their enormous commitment and support'.

The ability to interpret such measurements is critically dependent on having a good understanding of how they are affected by medication as well as by the disease. In some situations (e.g. the development of a new symptomatic treatment) a marker that is sensitive to medication effects is desirable. In other settings (e.g. the development of a disease modifying treatment) we would like a marker that is relatively unaffected by medication so we can see the state of the underlying condition.

The most commonly reported measure of eye movements in Parkinson’s disease is called ‘prosaccadic latency’. This is the time taken to move your eyes to look at something that appears in your field of view to one side or the other. Studies have given widely differing values for how this is affected by medication, differing not just in magnitude but also direction.  Our researchers working on the OxQUIP Study have shown in a large group of patients that this measure is sensitive to the presence of medication, which significantly increases it.  

The group also analysed several other aspects of fast eye movements. One of these was the time taken to do the opposite of the above, i.e. to look deliberately away from a visual stimulus, which is called ‘antisaccadic latency’. They found that this is clearly abnormal in Parkinson’s disease yet not significantly affected by the presence of medication.  It is therefore likely to be useful in future trials to measure the effects of drugs designed to slow disease progression.

Read the full paper

Similar stories

New insights gained into how the brain encodes information about the world

Scientists have developed a new way to test the theory that active neurons can change what they signal in the world, rather than keeping a stable correspondence to things (such as a features of an object, or ideas).

Oxford and Quinnipiac researchers discuss integrated clinical care, education, and research in multiple sclerosis

Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital's Mandell Center for Multiple Sclerosis Care and Neuroscience Research welcomed University of Oxford partners in September. Stakeholders from University of Oxford and Quinnipiac University met to discuss ongoing research and future opportunities to develop a Mandell MS Center concept of care in the UK.

Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellowship

Dr Rezvan Farahibozorg has received one of 17 Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellowships for 2022.

Three New Professors

Many congratulations to the following members of our Department who have been awarded the title of Professor in the recent Recognition of Distinction round.

Repurposed drug could help patients with motor neuron disease

A drug typically used to treat enlarged prostates and high blood pressure has shown promise as a potential new therapy for motor neuron disease (MND), according to a new study.

Finding out more about Parkinson’s by monitoring symptoms at home

Professor Chrystalina Antoniades explains how the COVID pandemic accelerated an innovation in one research project into Parkinson's Disease.