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This is one of four prestigious prizes for advances in neuroscience supported by the British Neuroscience Associations (BNA) and the Israel Society for Neuroscience (ISFN).

I am hugely grateful to the British Neuroscience Association, the ISFN and the Sieratzki Charitable Foundation for the award, particularly as it gave me the opportunity to travel to Eilat, meet Israeli colleagues and participate in what was a fantastic neuroscientific meeting
- Charlotte Stagg

The prizes aim to recognise and celebrate the outstanding achievements of neuroscientists working within the UK and Israel.

Dr Stagg specialises in brain imaging techniques at the Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging. Her research group uses cutting-edge imaging techniques in combination with non-invasive brain stimulation approaches to study motor plasticity, with the ultimate aim of developing new rehabilitation tools to maximise recovery after stroke.

Charlie travelled to the annual meeting of the ISFN in, Eilat, Israel to receive her award on 10 December and then gave a talk on ‘The neurochemistry of learning, and relearning, human motor skills’.

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