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This year marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of the first codified description of the condition that we now know as Parkinson's disease.

Associate Professor Chrystalina Antoniades from the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosicences, and Dr Patrick Lewis from the University of Reading have co-organised the following events to mark the anniversary, together with the Oxford branch of Parkinson's UK.

Exhibition, 11-19 September

The author of the publication describing the condition, James Parkinson, called the disease the Shaking Palsy. Parkinson's talents, however, stretched well beyond neurology. He was a political agitator, general science writer and an influential geologist - all aspects of his work that are showcased in an exhibition from the collections of the Bodleian Library.

Conference, 18 September

This conference for people with Parkinson's, families, friends and healthcare professionals is devised and presented by Parkinson's UK Oxford Branch in collaboration with the University of Oxford's Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences and other leading organisations.

Sessions cover:

  • Progress in research and therapy
  • Sharing best practice
  • Achieving best quality of life

Read more about the conference.

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