Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The 12 winners of the inaugural University of Oxford's Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Public Engagement with Research were announced on Friday 1 July by the Vice-Chancellor, Professor Louise Richardson, in a ceremony at Merton College.

Dr Chrystalina Antoniades won an award in the Early Career Researcher Category. Her research involves using visual perception to study neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease.

Taking part in these activities has given me a different perspective on my research and helped me understand better how it relates to the lives of the wider public. 
- Dr Chrystalina Antoniades

She has developed a collaboration with the Ashmolean Museum, and most recently organised a 'Brain Hunt' for Brain Awareness Week 2016. This was a four-day event reaching a total audience of over 1500 people.

As well as talks, the programme included interactive activities for children and adults such as making plasticine brains with different coloured areas encouraging people to think about how different brain regions have different roles in perception.

Chrystalina has also supported the development of a culture of public engagement with research in our Department, organising workshops and playing an instrumental role in the setting up of small public engagement awards to support other early career researchers.

Similar stories

New insights gained into how the brain encodes information about the world

Scientists have developed a new way to test the theory that active neurons can change what they signal in the world, rather than keeping a stable correspondence to things (such as a features of an object, or ideas).

Oxford and Quinnipiac researchers discuss integrated clinical care, education, and research in multiple sclerosis

Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital's Mandell Center for Multiple Sclerosis Care and Neuroscience Research welcomed University of Oxford partners in September. Stakeholders from University of Oxford and Quinnipiac University met to discuss ongoing research and future opportunities to develop a Mandell MS Center concept of care in the UK.

Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellowship

Dr Rezvan Farahibozorg has received one of 17 Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellowships for 2022.

Repurposed drug could help patients with motor neuron disease

A drug typically used to treat enlarged prostates and high blood pressure has shown promise as a potential new therapy for motor neuron disease (MND), according to a new study.

Finding out more about Parkinson’s by monitoring symptoms at home

Professor Chrystalina Antoniades explains how the COVID pandemic accelerated an innovation in one research project into Parkinson's Disease.

Insights into the molecular pathways of progressive multiple sclerosis

Text by Ian Fyfe for 'Nature Reviews Neurology'