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The 12 winners of the inaugural University of Oxford's Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Public Engagement with Research were announced on Friday 1 July by the Vice-Chancellor, Professor Louise Richardson, in a ceremony at Merton College.

Dr Chrystalina Antoniades won an award in the Early Career Researcher Category. Her research involves using visual perception to study neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease.

Taking part in these activities has given me a different perspective on my research and helped me understand better how it relates to the lives of the wider public. 
- Dr Chrystalina Antoniades

She has developed a collaboration with the Ashmolean Museum, and most recently organised a 'Brain Hunt' for Brain Awareness Week 2016. This was a four-day event reaching a total audience of over 1500 people.

As well as talks, the programme included interactive activities for children and adults such as making plasticine brains with different coloured areas encouraging people to think about how different brain regions have different roles in perception.

Chrystalina has also supported the development of a culture of public engagement with research in our Department, organising workshops and playing an instrumental role in the setting up of small public engagement awards to support other early career researchers.

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