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The capacity for visual training to improve visual loss after stroke

MRI scanner from the control room

What is the purpose of the research?

We are interested in understanding whether a visual training programme can be used to improve visual loss after stroke and whether there are changes in the functioning or organisation of the brain that underlie these improvements. We can investigate this by using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which is safe and non-invasive.

Who can take part?

We are looking for participants who are:

  • healthy
  • between 18 and 80 years of age
  • speak fluent English
  • have previously suffered damage to their visual system and have deficits in their vision
  • interested in participating in a long-term rehabilitation study (12 months)

You will be reimbursed for your time and reasonable travel expenses.

What does taking part involve?

The study lasts for 12 months. This includes 3 visits (baseline, 6-month and 12-month) to the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. You will also be asked to complete the visual training programme for 6-months at home either between baseline and the 6-month assessment (Initial Group) or between the 6-month and 12-month assessment (Delayed Group).

Are there any risks to taking part?

MRI is safe and non-invasive and does not involve any ionizing radiation(x-rays). However, MRI scans use a large magnet to work so are not suitable for everybody. Because of this, you will be asked pre-screening safety questions to help determine if you are able to take part. We do not carry out scans for diagnostic purposes, only for research.

Are there any benefits to taking part?

At this point we do not know whether you will benefit from taking part in this study. You may show improvements in visual functioning due to the visual rehabilitation programme, but this is not guaranteed. This study aims to understand how much improvement people make with training and whether we can use the changes in the brain to design better rehabilitation techniques.

How can I take part?

Please contact Hannah Willis to find out more information. There is no obligation to take part if you contact us for more information.

visual.rehab@ndcn.ox.ac.uk

01865 611458

CUREC ref: R60132/RE001