Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Patients with autoantibodies which target neuronal proteins can have pain as an under-recognised clinical manifestation.

Clinical characterization of leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 antibody (LGI1-Ab+) and contactin-associated protein-like 2 antibody (CASPR2-Ab+) patients with pain. (A) Representative example of live cell-based assay demonstrating HEK293T cells transfected with LGI1 or CASPR2 (green; tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein [EGFP]) and colocalized humanimmunoglobulin G (IgG) binding (red) in patients with LGI1 antibodies, patients with CASPR2 antibodies, and a healthy control.(B) Representative example of sera from patients with LGI1 or CASPR2 antibodies, but not from healthy controls, binding to rodent hippocampal sections.

In a new study, four research groups within the Department combine their strengths in autoimmunity (Irani), pain (Bennett and Dawes) and peripheral nerve diseases (Rinaldi).

Their collective findings reveal that patients with antibodies to LGI1 and CASPR2 show different clinical, immunological and neurobiological characteristics which may relate to the antibodies differentially targeting neurons which can mediate pain.

The findings have implications for improving the long-term outcomes of these patients and for our understanding of the basic biology of these antigenic targets.

Read the paper

Similar stories

Direct evidence of reduced NMDA receptors in people with form of encephalitis

NMDAR-antibody encephalitis is an autoimmune brain condition caused by patient’s own antibodies that bind to NMDA (N-Methyl-D-Aspartate) receptors in the synapses between nerve cells.

Director of MRC Brain Network Dynamics Unit appointed

From 2 January 2023, Professor Peter Magill will lead the Medical Research Council Brain Network Dynamics Unit (MRC BNDU) at the University of Oxford.

Study reveals association between diagnosis of a neuropsychiatric condition and severe outcome from COVID-19 infection, and other severe acute respiratory infections

New research from the University of Oxford has shown an increased risk of severe illness and death from both COVID-19 and other severe respiratory infections, such as influenza and pneumonia, among people with a pre-existing mental health condition.

New study shows clinical symptoms for Alzheimer’s can be predicted in preclinical models

Establishing preclinical models of Alzheimer’s that reflect in-life clinical symptoms of each individual is a critically important goal, yet so far it has not been fully realised. A new collaborative study from the University of Oxford has demonstrated that clinical vulnerability to an abnormally abundant protein in Alzheimer’s brain is in fact reflected in individual patient induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons.

Visit from the Sir Jules Thorn Charitable Trust

Earlier this month, we were delighted to welcome the Director of the Sir Jules Thorn Charitable Trust, Richard Benson, and its Chair of Trustees, Liz Charal.